Korean J Fam Med 2017; 38(3): 116-121  https://doi.org/10.4082/kjfm.2017.38.3.116
Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Behavior in Female Cancer Survivors: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2012
Eun-Ae Lee1, Jinyoung Shin1,2,*, Eun-Joo Hwang1, Jung-Woong Lee1
1Department of Family Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
2Center for Cancer Supportive Care, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Jinyoung Shin Tel: +82-2-3410-2449, Fax: +82-2-3410-0388, E-mail: jinyoung.shin@samsung.com
Received: February 16, 2016; Revised: July 10, 2016; Accepted: July 28, 2016; Published online: May 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

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Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to compare breast and cervical cancer screening rates between female cancer survivors and a population without cancer to identify factors related to cervical and breast cancer screening in cancer survivors.
Methods: We included 17,765 adults (738 cancer survivors and 17,027 individuals without cancer) in this study, all of whom who were 30 years of age or older and participated in the Fourth and Fifth Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys from 2007–2012. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to cervical and breast cancer screening uptake in female cancer survivors.
Results: The screening rate for breast cancer was 56.6%, which was higher than that in the non-cancer control group (P=0.001). The screening rate for cervical cancer was 51.4%, which was not different from that of the noncancer control group. In terms of breast cancer screening, cancer survivors showed no significant difference in the rate of screening 5 years after their cancer diagnosis. However, cervical cancer survivors were less likely to have cervical cancer screening 10 years after their cancer diagnosis. There was no significant association between cancer screening and sociodemographic factors.
Conclusion: Breast and cervical cancer screening rates in Korean female cancer survivors are low. Secondary primary cancer screening of female cancer survivors needs to be planned in a comprehensive manner, with the consideration of influences beyond sociodemographic factors.
Keywords: Breast Neoplasms; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms; Early Detection of Cancer; Survivors


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