Korean J Fam Med 2017; 38(6): 380-382  https://doi.org/10.4082/kjfm.2017.38.6.380
A Brief Psychotic Episode with Depressive Symptoms in Silent Right Frontal Lobe Infarct
Salziyan Badrin1,*, Noraini Mohamad2, Nor Akma Yunus1, Maryam Mohd Zulkifli1
1Department of Family Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia
2School of Dental Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia
Salziyan Badrin Tel: +60-9-7673000 (ext. 6608), Fax: +60-9-7653370, E-mail: salziyan@usm.my
Received: May 31, 2017; Revised: June 14, 2017; Accepted: July 12, 2017; Published online: November 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

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Abstract
Psychiatric symptoms may be related to a silent cerebral infarct, a phenomenon that has been described previously in literature. Acute psychosis or other neuropsychiatric symptoms including depression may present in stroke patients and patients with lesions either within the prefrontal or occipital cortices, or in subcortical areas such as the basal ganglia, thalamus, mid-brain, and brainstem. Psychosis in clinical stroke or in silent cerebral infarction is uncommon and not well documented in the literature. Neurological deficits are the most common presentation in stroke, and nearly a third of patients that suffer a stroke may experience psychological disorders such as depression and anxiety, related to physical disability. The present case report describes an elderly female patient who presented with hallucinations and depressive symptoms, and was discovered to have a recent right frontal brain infarction, without other significant neurological deficits.
Keywords: Depression; Psychotic Disorders; Stroke; Stroke Manifestations; Aged


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